Wine Regions


  

Wine Tasting Notes Organized by Region

Wine regions are general areas within a country, within which grapes are grown for wine. They are defined based on geography and help to classify wine production and sales.

Wine regions need to have a balanced combination of sun, shade and rain, as well as moderate temperatures, for grapes to grow. As such, most wine regions are between the 50 and 30 degree latitude bands, in both the Northern and Southern hemisphere.

Below are the largest wine producing regions in the 4 largest wine producing countries, with the production amount of each measured in hectoliters.

In France, the largest wine producing regions are the Languedoc-Roussillon (15,000,000), Bordeaux (6,375,000), Cotes du Rhone/Rhone Valley (3,375,000) and Loire Valley (3,000,000)

In Italy, the some popular wine producing regions are Sicily (8,073,000), Apulia (7,236,000), Veneto (6,785,000), Piedmont (3,405,000)

In Spain large regions include Rioja, (2,700,000 hectoliters), Utiel-Requena (1,800,000), Ribera del Duero (760,000), and Valencia (700,000),

In the United States, the largest wine producing region by far is California (20,000,000), making up 89% of the wine production, followed by New York (1,140,000), Washington (660,000) and Oregon (100,000)

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